Why We’re Needed

We believe that the power of community can create society-wide change in the way we age.

Sustainability is Key

Current guides and networks exist to assist local community members in navigating the legal and organizational tasks to launch a new village in their area. But shortly thereafter, village leaders must wrestle with longer-term questions about sustainability.

Scale = Greater Impact

Older Californians represent a powerful demographic. Many statewide health networks, pharmaceutical companies, foundations, service organizations and others want to find ways to improve health and wellness as we age. But they need scale to make an impact and don’t have capacity to work with individual villages.

Local Ingenuity Deserves a Statewide Stage

From San Diego to the Central Valley to the Bay Area and beyond, communities are changing aging through innovative programs being run by individual villages. Too often, these successes remain known only to their members.

The Aging Revolution is Now

We know that better physical and mental health result from the increased community interaction and personalized support available to members of villages. Our state needs a leader to kickstart the analysis of the “big data” of health and wellness indicators that we generate as we age.

California Demands More Options for Aging Well

Moderate and middle-class Californians of all backgrounds and identities have few options to support their aging in place, even though they comprise the largest group of people 65 and older.

ChaiVIllageLA members toast another successful outing

Member Spotlight

ChaiVillageLA

ChaiVillageLA is the first synagogue-based village in the country, a bold partnership of two cutting-edge Reform synagogues — Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills and Temple Isaiah — to challenge their congregants to rethink their paradigms of aging and use their accumulated experience, talents, wisdom and creativity to build a community of mutual respect, support, caring and concern. In ChaiVillageLA there is no distinction between members and volunteers. Rather, all members are expected to contribute approximately four hours per month to the health and vitality of the community. Service can be in a variety of forms, including serving on a committee, working in the office, organizing an interest group or program, or providing assistance to a fellow member.